What’s your Olympic memorabilia worth?

Here are the Top 10 most expensive Olympic memorabilia ever sold.
OLYMPIC medals are collector’s items, and are frequently sold at auction. The desirability of the medal depends on varying factors from the year of the event to the athlete who won it. To get a sense of the price range, Money.com points to a recent Olympic memorabilia auction which took place in January of 2016, where prices for gold medals started around $10,000.
Do you know that Jesse Owens’ 1936 Olympic gold medal from the Berlin Games, is the most expensive Olympic memorabilia ever sold at RM4.47 million. It was sold on December, 2013, and the current owner is the Pittsburgh Penguins co-owner Ron Burkle, who bought the medal at auction in December.
Fans of the games can also rake in the money by collecting Olympics memorabilia. For example, Gold medals from the London 2012 Summer games, which are comprised of six grams of 24-carat gold and the remainder sterling silver, have an approximate scrap value of $501 according to Money.com. CNN reports that Rio’s gold medals have a current market price of $587 for the material alone.
So, how much money can these rarities fetch up to? Let’s take a look at the top 10 most expensive Olympic memorabilia ever sold in recent times!

10. Bobby Pearce Archive (Medals, Photos, Awards, Etc)

Sold For: RM233,417.73
Date: July, 2012

Australian-Canadian rower who won Gold for Australia at 1928 and 1932 Summer Games in Amsterdam and Los Angeles.

 

9. Helsinki 1952 Olympic Torch

Sold For: RM453,000.59
Date: November, 2006

With 22 held by collectors, the 1952 Torch is one of the most sought after items among buyers. The last one sold in Paris in April, 2011.

 

8. Sochi 2014 Commemorative Gold Coin

Sold For: RM710,721.190
When: October, 2013

An unknown Russian buyer purchased the 3kg gold coin from a Sberbank branch in the Amur Region of Russia’s Far East.

 

7. Grenoble 1968 Torch

Sold For: RM757,551.66
Date: October, 2012

There are 33 known torches from the Grenoble Games in France. You know, just in case you have one lying around.

 

6. Lake Placid 1980 Olympic Gold Medal, Ice Hockey

Sold For: RM950,995.150
Date: November, 2010

The gold medal won by Mark Wells, a member of the ‘Miracle on Ice’ Team USA that beat Russia in the 1980 Games.

 

5. Helsinki 1952 Olympic Torch

Sold For: RM1,101,890
Date: April, 2011

Another of the 22 known torches from the 1956 Olympic Games. A Greek auction house sold the item in the final months of 2006.

 

4. Rare Beijing 2008 Olympic Commemorative Gold Coin

Sold For: RM1,759,000
Date: January, 2011

Only 29 of the 10kg coins were minted, with one being sold by Heritage Auction Galleries back in January, 2011.

 

3. Bréal’s Silver Cup

Sold For: RM2,635,756.36
Date: April 2012

The third most expensive item of Olympics memorabilia sold is the special decorative silver cup awarded to Greek marathon runner Spyridon Louis as a prize for winning the first marathon race at Athens 1896, the first Olympic Games in modern history.

 

2. Wladimir Klitschko’s 1996 Gold Medal

Sold For: RM3.06 million
Date: March, 2012

The Klitschko brothers’ charitable foundation sold the medal from the Atlanta Games to an anonymous Ukrainian millionaire in March 2012.

 

1. Jesse Owens 1936 Olympic Gold Medal

Sold For: RM4.47 million
Date: December, 2013

African American sprinter’s gold medal from the 1936 Berlin Games. The current owner is the Pittsburgh Penguins co-owner Ron Burkle, who bought the medal at auction in December. His medals were of course famous for being literal symbols against the concept of Aryan racial superiority, an idea promoted by Nazi Germany at the time.

Looks like there’s plenty of cash to be earned from collecting Olympic memorabilia. Perhaps one of the many pins, medals, or merchandise from this year’s Olympic Games in Rio will enter the list not too far in the future? Until then… keep collecting, you Olympic nerds!

 

*Article Source




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